Our Food‎ > ‎

What's on the Menu, and When?

We generally serve our food family-style, that is to say, we put it all on the table, and you get to try it all.  So if there are 14 dishes on the menu... make sure you don't fill up on the first 3!  For more information for vegetarians, please click here


PLEASE SEE THE POSTS BELOW FOR MORE DETAILS ON OUR UPCOMING NIGHTS. Dinners usually start at 7.30pm.  Please don't arrive early if possible!
Please book as early as possible to avoid disappointment.  To book, please send us an e-mail to info@parkholmesupperclub.co.uk




  • Sat 3rd June - Nyonya Night - my Nyonya heritage with family recipes
  • Sat 13th May - PSC's African Safari - we curate some of Africa's best dishes
  • Sat 25th March 2017: 8,000 miles for peace - A food journey following an epic 1962 Peace Walk
  • Sat 11th March 2017: Provincial French Supperclub - salade folle, cassoulet, tarte tatin - the best of France
  • Sat 18th February 2017 From Russia With Love - warming Russian food to combat the winter blues
  • 28th January 2017 - Year of the Rooster - our signature Chinese New Year supperclub
  • Sat 14th January 2017 - Detox supperclub - vegetarian food from around the world
  • Sat 12th November 2016 - Malay Malam - join us for blue rice and green cake, some of the best of Malay cuisine
  • Sat 22nd October 2016 - Syrian Song - memorable recipes from a trip to Syria before the war
  • Sat 24th September 2016 - Road to Revolution, tracing the changes in Chinese food from Imperial China to Chairman Mao.
  • Sat 16th July - Singaporean Favourites - the best food Singapore has to offer, here in one place.
  • Sat 11th June - In the foodsteps of Ibn Battutah - food travels around the world with the world's greatest traveller
  • Sat 23rd April - A Georgian Feast on St George's day
  • Sat19th March 2016 - Cancelled Elvis Chicken - the very very best of Indian food 
  • Sat 6th Feb 2016 - Red Fire Monkey - our signature Chinese New Year supperclub
  • Sat 28th November 2015 - Belen's Morocco - our annual delicious trip to Morocco with Belen
  • Sat 7th November 2015 - Korean Mama supperclub - guest chef Daniel Vais cooks exceptional Korean for us!
  • Sat 26th September 2105 - Chilli Crab and Hainanese Chicken Rice - our 5th anniversary supperclub
  • Sat 12th September 2015 - Malay Malam - join us for blue rice and green cake, some of the best of Malay cuisine
  • Sat 4th July - Belen's Spanish food - wonderful Andalucian cooking from talented chef Belen
  • Sat 20th June - Georgian supperclub - Delicious Caucasus cooking at its best !
  • Sat 6th June - Zaytoun Palestinian supperclub - authentic Palestinian food using fairtrade Palestinian products from Zaytoun
  • Sat 9th May 2015 - Ghana Night - featuring the delicious cooking of guest chef Nana Prempeh
  • Sat 25th April 2015 - Penang Nyonya food - the classics of "foodie" Penang including Asam Laksa
  • Sat 21st March 2015 - 2 Little Mermaids - a fresh haul of fish from Billingsgate fish market!
  • Sat 28th February 2015 - Chinese Year of the Sheep - our signature Chinese New Year supperclub
  • Sat 7th February 2015 - Provincial French Supperclub - salade folle, cassoulet, tarte tatin - the best of France
  • Sat 31st January 2015 - From Russia With Love - warming Russian food to combat the winter blues
  • Sat17th January 2015 - Detox supperclub - vegetarian food from around the world
  • Sat 6th December 2014 - Christmas in Georgia
  • Sat 15th November 2014  Syrian Song - due to popular demand, a repeat performance!
  • Sat 25th October 2014 - Syrian Song - help Syria by eating at ours!
  • Saturday 4th October 2014 - Cancelled Elvis Chicken - some of the best Indian dishes you will ever eat, no kidding.
  • Saturday 27th September 2014 - 8,000 miles for peace - A food journey following an epic 1962 Peace Walk
  • Saturday 13th September 2014 - The Road to Revolution- Chinese food from Dynastic China to Chairman Mao
  • Saturday 26th July 2014 - Vietnam!  an exceptional guest chef will introduce you to Vietnamese home cooking
  • Saturday 12th July 2014 - Singaporean Favourites - some of our favourite dishes in the whole world!
  • Saturday 21st June 2014: Back in the USSR, a reminder of the days of Russian Imperialism...
  • Saturday 31st May - Authentic Moroccan from our Guest Chef, Belen's childhood
  • Saturday 10th May -  - In the foodsteps of Ibn Battutah - food travels around the world with the world's greatest traveller
  • Saturday 12th April - a special private celebration with MSF Field staff to celebrate raising £50,000
  • Saturday 29th March 2014 - Singaporean Favourites Supperclub - the best of Singaporean food with Black Pepper Crab and Hainanese Chicken Rice
  • Sat 22nd March - Chindian Vegetarian - the best vegetarian food from China and India in one place!
  • Sat 8th March - Malay Malam - join us for blue rice and green cake, some of the best of Malay cuisine
  • Sat 22nd Feb - Russian supperclub will we have a cold Feb? it'll be delicious warming food and vodka at ours, anyway!
  • Sat 8th Feb - Fun social wine tasting with a Syrian food buffet
  • Sat 1st Feb - Chinese New Year our signature supperclub - the year of the horse!
  • Sat 18th January - Provincial French Supperclub - all the comfort French food like cassoulet and chocolate mousse...
  • Sat 14th December - A Foodie Christmas - THE Foodie Christmas party, join us for a feast!
  • Sat 7th December - Bethlehem Supperclub - an authentic Palestinian Christmas meal
  • Sat 23rd November - Cancelled Elvis Chicken - some of the best Indian dishes you will ever eat, no kidding.
  • Sat 9th November - International Vegetarian - some of the best vegetarian dishes from around the world
  • Sat 19th October- Grandma's Legacy - My mother and her cousin are hosting an evening of my grandmother's Malaysian Chinese dishes which are family favourites
  • Sat 5th October - Nyonya Night - Straits Chinese cooking
  • Sat 21st September 2013 - The Road to Revolution- Chinese food from Dynastic China to Chairman Mao
  • Saturday 31st August 2013 - 2 Little Mermaids - the best of the haul from Billingsgate Fish Market
  • Saturday 24th August 2013 - In the foodsteps of Ibn Battutah - food travels around the world with the world's greatest traveller
  • Saturday 13th July - Love Letter to Damascus - eat Syrian food and support MSF's aid camps
  • Saturday 22nd June : Back in the USSR - our run down of the cuisine of the ex-Soviet Union
  • Saturday 1st June - GUEST CHEF: Moroccan - dishes from Belen's childhood in Morocco
  • Saturday 25th May - Ghana Night 2013 - Home cooked, traditional Ghanaian food cooked by Nana Prempeh
  • Saturday 27th April - Singaporean Favourites Supperclub - the best of Singaporean food with Black Pepper Crab and Hainanese Chicken Rice
  • Sat 13th April 2013 - The Legacy of Christopher Columbus - Old World recipes using New World foods
  • Sat 6th April 2013 - GUEST CHEF, Daniel Vais, cooks Korean like a Korean mama
  • Sat 23rd March 2013 - Malay Malam - delicious and very traditional Malay dishes
  • Sat 9th March 2013 - The Mighty Mung - go the whole mung with our mung-themed evening!
  • Sat 23rd Feb 2013 - Syrian Supperclub - help Syria by eating at ours!
  • Sat 9th February 2013 - Year of the Snake Supperclub - traditional Chinese New Year cuisine on Chinese New Year's eve!
  • Sat 26th January 2013 -  The First Moscow Supperclubs Russian food to combat the January cold
  • Sat 12th January 2013 -  January Detox delicious international vegan food
  • Sat 15th December 2012 - The Alternative Christmas Roast - warming oven-cooked dishes from around the world
  • Sat 1st December 2012 - La goût de la France - provincial and warming home style French cooking
  • Sat 17th November 2012 - The Road to Revolution- Chinese food from Dynastic China to Chairman Mao
  • Sat 3rd November 2012 - Celebrate Diwali with an Indian supperclub that put us on the foodie map!
  • Sat 20th October 2012 - The Georgian Feast - To celebrate the first ever peaceful recent elections and transition of power
  • Sat 29th September - Malay Malam - Malay dishes there's NO WAY you can get in this country....
  • Sat 1st September - Spherical Supperclub - all things round and delicious!
  • Sat 18th August - Viva Mexicana - Guest MumChef direct from MEXICO to cook us traditional home cooking
  • Sat 4th August -  Cercle de réflexion - Oddly named yet delicious food from around the world
  • Tues 19th June - Billingsgate Fish night - fresh fish direct from Billingsgate!
  • Friday 8th June - In the foodsteps of Ibn Battutah - food travels around the world with the world's greatest traveller
  • Sat 19th May - Singaporean Favourites - classic Singaporean dishes like Black Pepper crab, Hainanese Chicken Rice, and Nyonya Kuih
  • Tues 1st May (Labour Day) and 8th May - Back in the USSR - recipes from Russia, Uzbekistan, Georgia, Kyrgystan, Ukraine, Lithuania, Armenia, Khazakstan, Tajikistan and more... as many of the ex-Soviet states as we can manage!  With help from Uzbek, Armenian and Lithuanian friends.
  • Fri 13th April - Passover - A Celebration of Freedom - Passover is the longest continually celebrated festival on earth.  Mentioned in the Torah, the Bible and the Quran, the origins of passover unite us all.  Come and try all the most traditional foods, chicken soup with Matzo balls, gefilte fish etc....
  • Sunday 1st April - Cooking Supper - cooking lesson teaching delicious supper dishes you'll cook again and again
  • Sat 31st March - Telling a life in Vegan Food -  the travels and heritage of my vegan friends Veena and Maurelio
  • Fri 23rd March - The Georgian Feast - try classic Silk Road dishes from the exotic Republic of Georgia
  • Fri 16th March - Malay Malam - all the classic Malay dishes including Curry Puffs, Chicken Satay, Nasi Kerabu, Ayam Masak Merah, Beef Rendang, Ikan Bakar, ABC...
  • Sat 10th March - Malay Malam - Fully booked
  • Weds 7th March - Help Syria Supperclub - Fabulous Syrian food and all the money to MSF who is working there
  • Friday 17th Feb - Party! celebrating Alicia's new life-to-be
  • Monday 13th Feb - Cook your Valentine Dinner - cooking class in which you will prepare your dinner, ready to take home & serve the next day!
  • Sat 11th Feb 2012 - Puddings and Piano - a light dinner, a huge selection of the most delicious English puddings, and a pianist to boot
  • Sat 28th January 2012 - Chinese Year of the DRAGON Banquet - all the traditional Chinese New Year dishes including hand made dumplings...
  • Sat 14th January 2012 -The First Moscow Supperclubs - winter warmers from Russia with some interesting foreign influences...
  • Sat 10th December - Ghanaian Night - Guest MumChef - a regular guest has volunteered her mum to cook some serious Ghanaian home cooking!
  • Weds 7th December - private booking
  • Sat 12th November - Nyonya Night - with a little help from my mum - Straits Chinese dishes I grew up with from Malaysia and Singapore
  • Sat 22nd October 2011 - 2 Little Mermaids - a haul of fresh seafood dishes direct from Billingsgate market
  • Sat 8th October 2011 - Indian Banquet - our highly reviewed selection of all the most delicious and unusual Indian dishes
  • Sat 24th Sept 2011 - Road to Revolution - Chinese food from Imperial Dynasties to Chairman Mao
  • Sat 3rd Sept 2011 - The Georgian Feast - dine fit for a king at our groaning Georgian table!
  • Sat 30th July 2011 - Singaporean Favourites - Black Pepper Crab, Hainanese Chicken Rice, Nyonya Kueh...
  • Sat 9th July 2011 - private booking
  • Sat 2nd July 2011 - Spanish Supperclub - guest chef Pablo's mother is visiting from Spain with her family cookbook; paella etc...
  • Sat 25th June 2011 - The End of the Silk Road - home cooking from Georgia, Turkey and Syria.
  • Sat 11th June 2011 - Malay Malam - authentic Malay food
  • Sat 21st May 2011 - 2 Little Mermaids - our fishy haul direct from Billingsgate Fish
  • Sat 7th May 2011 - Filipina!  Reena will be cooking her heritage food from the Phillipines, recipes from her mother and grandmother
  • Sat 23rd April 2011 - Pick a Pepper - Black Pepper Crab, Mapo Tofu with Sichuan Pepper, stuffed chilli pepper, etc etc
  • Sat 9th April 2011 - Syrian Supperclub II due to exceptional demand...
  • Sat 2nd April 2011 - Syrian Supperclub with kibbe famous even in Damascus...
  • Sat 12th and 19th March 2011 - Eat Chickens for Science - Hainanese Chicken Rice and other delights
  • Sat 26th Feb 2011 - Malay night featuring Curry Puffs, Ikan Bakar, Beef Rendang, Ais Kachang and other such delights
  • Weds 16th Feb 2011 - A Gastronome's tour of Italy - the choices of my Masters student from the Institute of Gastronomy, Colorno, Italy
  • Sunday 13th Feb 2011 - Dim Sum Cooking class, click here for details
  • Fri 11th Feb 2011 - Itinerant Indian - Indian food you'll never have had before and will want to have again!
  • Weds 2nd Feb 2011 - Chinese New Year's Eve Banquet with traditional Chinese New Year foods like hand made dumplings and steamed fish
  • Mon 24th Jan 2011 - The Georgian Feast - come and experience true Silk Road cooking from the Republic of Georgia
  • Weds 5th Jan 2011 - Nyonya Night - my grandmother's Straits Chinese cooking
  • Sat 20th November 2010 - "different" Indian - fully booked by a private party
  • Tues 16th November 2010 - Syrian Night - just back from 15 days in Syria with a notebook full of recipes... !
  • Thurs 14th October 2010 - Norman Night - a night of French cuisine inspired by the cheese, cream and apples of Normandy
  • Sat 9th October 2010 - The Road to Revolution - 3 eras of Chinese food, taking a tour through history
  • Weds 29th September 2010 - Northern Italian food including home made raviolis
  • Weds 22nd September 2010 - "different" Indian - Gujarati steamed savoury cake, Bengali Green Fish Curry, Himalayan Lamb and Yoghurt Curry, Mangalorean Pineapple Curry

Nyonya Night

posted 15 May 2017, 16:54 by Parkholme Supperclub   [ updated 15 May 2017, 16:59 ]

3rd June 2017 is Nyonya Night.

I am half Nyona.  Nyona are the women of the Straits Chinese - Chinese diaspora that left China, in my case 7 generations ago, to settle in the Malacca Straits, i.e. Malaysia and Singapore.  Our cooking is a class of its own - essentially Chinese, but using local herbs and spices, to give a fragrant twist.  We use pandan leaves, and galangal, tamarind, laksa leaves, betel leaves, lemongrass and lime leaves, as well as spices that would be more traditionally used in Indian cooking.

My Grandmother was Nyona, and so is my mother.  Living in a large house with a massive extended family, my grandmother's domain was the kitchen - she was in charge of feeding the whole household, which at one point was up to around 25 people and even more at times like Chinese New Year, when the whole extended family would appear to enjoy her cooking.

Luckily for her, she didn't have to go to the market and lug back the heavy trolley of food I have to for every supperclub.  No, she had The Van Man.  The Van Man (as my mother remembers he was called) used to pass by the house almost daily with choice ingredients from the local market.  No doubt a household such as ours was lucrative - and fairly wealthy - so probably we were an early stop on his route.  He had vegetables, fish, pork, chicken and fruit, and would drive right into the garden and sell it there under the spreading guava tree.  I expect my grandma put on her orange wooden clogs that always waited outside the kitchen door, and stepped out onto the dewy grass every morning to barter with him.

Grandma's cooking was legendary - she could cook an enormous repertoire of things, even dim sum and traditional Malaysian "kuih", cakes made with rice, coconut and palm sugar, which are normally made by specialists.  We had a family curry powder and they would buy kilos of whole spices and take it all to the miller to be milled and packed into any spare container going; to this day it often appears in squash bottles and old Nescafe jars.

I'm going to cook some dishes that I remember from her repertoire, and ones that are enjoyed in my family, using all these Nyonya herbs and spices.   We'll start with Poh Piah - it's a kind of spring roll that is not deep fried.  You assemble it at the table - rather like the crispy duck pancake rolls, you roll your own, and I remember that she used to put crab into hers, so I may have a go at the laborious task of picking a pile of crabmeat.  My father always loved this dish and so I think she used to cook it often because of him.

I'll also cook the family Chicken Curry - with curry powder that is still made to her recipe in Malaysia, and shipped back in the old Nescafe jars.  I met a man in his 70's who ate her curry when he was in his late 20s, and still could remember it!  He asked me for the recipe.

Grandma used to make what is known as Singapore Noodles - though I'm sure she never called it that - curry fried rice vermicelli, and my aunt was famous for her Satay & Satay Sauce, so now that I have a gas barbeque, we'll make some chicken satay too!   And whilst the barbeque is on, some Otak Otak which is another classic Nyonya dish - fish in a spicy custard, wrapped in banana leaves and barbequed.   My mother enjoys Rojak, which is a fruit/vegetable salad with a tangy tamarind and shrimp sauce.  There was always a clear soup at dinner - usually pork bone, with Old Cucumber (whatever that was, I can't get that here) and other things that I CAN get here, thank goodness.  And no Nyonya night could be complete without a Sambal dish - a spicy fermented shrimp and chilli based sauce, fried with a vegetable usually. 

I'm also going to cook Pineapple Tarts - another Nyonya speciality, most particularly because my good friend has recently sent me the special moulds to make them look pretty, and Kuih Talam, which seems to be everyone's favourite, a white salted coconut layer over a green pandan rice jelly.  Definitely tastes better than it sounds!

I'm sure some other ideas will come to light after I spend the next three weeks being told what to cook by my mother :-) Perhaps we can persuade her to contribute.

Price will be £45 of which £35 will go direct to MSF.

Please mail us with bookings on info@parkholmesupperclub.co.uk


PSC's African Safari

posted 23 Apr 2017, 12:00 by Parkholme Supperclub   [ updated 14 May 2017, 04:23 ]

13th May 2017

One of the best things about travel is throwing yourself on, and discovering, the "kindness of strangers".  Yet sometimes, you do not need to leave home.

This supperclub is inspired by a recent incident that was both unexpected and touching. I did an hour-long telephone interview with a young journalist who wanted to talk about the supperclub, but also, its sister project, Bags of Taste.  At the end of this hour, he politely thanked me and asked me to let him know if there was anything he could ever do for me.  I didn't hesitate to ask, as years running Parkholme Supperclub has taught me - "Ibrahim", I said. "That's a muslim name.  Where are you from?".  "Mali" he replied.  "Excellent. Please ask your mother for her best recipe, and send it to me".  Well, you can but ask.  We have had some great recipes come to us this way; our Uzbek Plov came from a family friend of an Uzbek I know ("neither Oxana nor mum can cook a good plov, but I know a man who can". -"Now's the time to ask him"); the alarmingly named Placinta was from the uncle of a Moldovan guest (the best cook in the family, apparently).

You don't always get a reply to such requests, so imagine my surprise when I received the following response:  "My mother said she would prefer to teach you herself, rather than just give you recipes". 

Thus was arranged one of the best cooking lessons I have ever had.  Mrs. Maiga was charming, and funny.  Her son Ibrahim also attended and whilst he led me (oft-interrupted) through the fascinating recent-ish history of Mali, which I knew little about, his mother peppered it with hysterical and personal anecdotes from her and Mali's communist past ("mum's a communist", Ibrahim offered, by way of explanation)

I'll be cooking a couple of Mrs Maiga's recipes - Malian Jollof rice - quite unlike any other jollof rice I've ever had - and also Yassa - which she helpfully informed me was also eaten in Senegal, so we will represent Senegal with that one.  It's become a firm favourite already!

We'll keep all the recipes Sub Saharan, and try to spread it around as much as possible, otherwise things tend to get dominated by West Africa.  At dinner, I'll tell the story of my first ever Nigerian food - invited for dinner by Chief Ojora, chief of the Yoruba tribe - but suffice to say that I was not expecting African food to be so spicy.  You have been warned - but we'll tone it down a bit, and not everything is blow-your head off anyway.  And, my Nigerian accent is quite good, at least when impersonating Chief Ojora!

On the menu will be (they're coloured in on the map - if anyone wants to suggest anything that can colour a few more in the upper middle, we're listening!)

Ghana - Nana's infamous peanut soup with rice balls (v)

Nigeria - Efo Riro  (prawns, spinach, onions, tomatoes) - a dish I've been cooking since Chief Ojora days and I'm told I do it well!

Senegal - Yassa - one of Mrs. Maira's dishes, the main ingredients of onion and chicken belie its deliciousness

Mali - Joloff Rice, cooked with lamb

Congo - Gari Foto - cassava meal with eggs - tastes better than it sounds! (v)

South Africa - Chalaka and Pap - great names for a tasty dish of mixed vegetables & beans, and cornmeal porridge (v)

Ethiopia - Atakilt Wat - Ethiopians do many good vegetarian dishes but this one elevates simple cabbage to the sublime (v)

Liberia - another alarmingly named dish, Chuck Rice - a change from the tomato-based jolloff, this one is green with spinach & okra (v)

Kenya - Kunde, a black bean stew with peanuts; again, nicer than it sounds (v)

Eritrea - Hamli, an Italianate fried greens dish (v)

Everywhere - Fried Plantain, lovely sweet and sticky (v)

Dessert:

South Africa - Malva pudding, which is their answer to Sticky Toffee Pudding, but not so sweet

Zimbabwe - Sweet Potato Cookies (they're a bit like scones)


Cost will be £45 of which £35 will go to MSF, who of course work in many of these countries.
Please mail us with bookings on info@parkholmesupperclub.co.uk

Year of the Rooster Chinese New Year 2017

posted 5 Jan 2017, 11:07 by Parkholme Supperclub   [ updated 9 Jan 2017, 17:18 ]

28th January 2017 is the Chinese Year of the Rooster.  We should celebrate this because we are moving out of the year of the Monkey - the Red Fire Monkey - which is temperamental, unpredictable, and irritable! According to Chinese astrology, the Rooster years are known to be filled with integrity and efficiency - difficult to believe I know, but hope springs eternal. Hard work is the key to achieving success this year. It's also a great year to get married!

In the legends surrounding the choice of the animals for the Chinese horoscopes, the Rooster made its contribution through working hard and waking the humans early every morning.  Thus it was rewarded with being picked - and apparently the Jade Emperor picked a red flower and put it on its head as a symbol of his approval.  Though I think it's fair to say the Rooster made his case quite vehemently before being ultimately chosen.

This is our signature Chinese New Year supper which will include the traditional Chinese New Year dumplings, both sweet and savoury, and a great long list of other dishes that will keep appearing as usual.  Join us !

Our banquet menu will be:

Chinese pickles and Preserved Cucumbers in XO sauce - I remember these from the start of banquets when I was a child
 
Jiaozi/Guo Tie or Potsticker dumplings - These handmade pork and vegetable dumplings signify family reunion. In northern China families traditionally spend New Year's Eve together preparing the dumplings, which are eaten at midnight. Crescent-shaped Jiaozi are a symbol of wealth and prosperity because of their resemblance to ancient Chinese money (silver ingots).

"Ah Sweet as Honey" - a lamb dish from the Imperial Court of the Qing Dynasty, favourite dish of the Empress Dowager Cixi

Oyster Omelette - this is a Fujianese speciality - yes it has real oysters in it - a really special dish!

Xinjiang Cumin Chicken - an unusual dish from Xinjiang province, in the far west of China, where there are Indian influences to their cooking.

Stir Fried Cucumbers- a dish that’s very popular, but little known outside China

“Delicious” Tofu – this is one of my favourite vegetarian dishes, cooked with chilli bean sauce and spring onions

Spring Onion noodles with Cha Siu - noodles signify longevity - it's important not to cut them!  Our cha siu is legendary....

Chinese Aubergines – you’ll probably never have had aubergines like this before, but they are exceptional

Steamed whole Cantonese Seabass  The word for fish, "Yu," sounds like the words both for wish and abundance, and serving a fish at the end of the meal symbolizes a wish for abundance in the coming year

Tang Yuen  these round sweet dumplings, stuffed with red bean paste, are symbolic of family unity and harmony. Tang stands for reunion and yuen means round or complete.

Cost will be £45 of which £35 will go direct to MSF.  Please mail us with bookings on info@parkholmesupperclub.co.uk

RED FIRE MONKEY - 6th Feb 2016

posted 22 Jan 2016, 16:20 by Parkholme Supperclub   [ updated 22 Jan 2016, 16:48 ]

6th Feb 2016
This Chinese New Year is the year of the Red Fire Monkey.  Monkeys are tricky animals so you'll have to be smart to get ahead this year!  

When I was a child I used to read Monkey God comics that I found lying around in my grandmother's house.  I couldn't read Chinese, so I would sit around and look at the pictures, imagining the story.  I probably wasn't far off.  He had a cloud that he rode around on (in the movies it looked more like pink cotton candy - but the comic books were not in colour!) and a fat monk friend who was a wicked fighter with his staff.  The women (usually goddesses) were impossibly beautiful and had these kind of long dangly sleeves that would be impossible to cook in.

At Chinese New Year the entire family would descend on my grandmother's house and all the women, none of whom seemed to possess sleeves like that, would be yelling at each other in the kitchen, in a most ungoddess-like manner.  Woks would be banging and all manner of food would appear, dish by dish.  We had 2 large dining tables, but with all the family it still required a couple of sittings to get everyone fed.  When you'd eaten your fill you stood up and let someone else take your place.  It was sort of pot luck which dishes appeared whilst you were available to eat them.

You get to keep your seat all evening through at our signature Chinese New Year supper which will include the traditional Chinese New Year dumplings, both sweet and savoury, and a great long list of other dishes that will keep appearing as usual.  Join us !

Our banquet menu will be:

Chinese pickles and Preserved Cucumbers in XO sauce - I remember these from the start of banquets when I was a child
 
Jiaozi/Guo Tie or Potsticker dumplings - These handmade pork and vegetable dumplings signify family reunion. In northern China families traditionally spend New Year's Eve together preparing the dumplings, which are eaten at midnight. Crescent-shaped Jiaozi are a symbol of wealth and prosperity because of their resemblance to ancient Chinese money (silver ingots).

"Ah Sweet as Honey" - a lamb dish from the Imperial Court of the Qing Dynasty, favourite dish of the Empress Dowager Cixi

Oyster Omelette - this is a Fujianese speciality - yes it has real oysters in it - a really special dish!

Xinjiang Cumin Chicken - an unusual dish from Xinjiang province, in the far west of China, where there are Indian influences to their cooking.

Stir Fried Cucumbers- a dish that’s very popular, but little known outside China

“Delicious” Tofu – this is one of my favourite vegetarian dishes, cooked with chilli bean sauce and spring onions

Spring Onion noodles with Cha Siu - noodles signify longevity - it's important not to cut them!  Our cha siu is legendary....

Chinese Aubergines – you’ll probably never have had aubergines like this before, but they are exceptional

Steamed whole Cantonese Seabass  The word for fish, "Yu," sounds like the words both for wish and abundance, and serving a fish at the end of the meal symbolizes a wish for abundance in the coming year

Tang Yuen  these round sweet dumplings are symbolic of family unity and harmony. Tang stands for reunion and yuen means round or complete.


Cost will be £45 of which £35 will go direct to MSF.  Please mail us with bookings on info@parkholmesupperclub.co.uk

Belen's Spanish Food

posted 18 Jun 2015, 09:48 by Parkholme Supperclub   [ updated 18 Jun 2015, 09:50 ]

One of our regular volunteers, Belen,  is Spanish and a very talented cook. She has cooked us some fabulous meals in the past, so we invite the lucky few to come and sample her Andalucian cooking for the very first time.  Here are some words from her about the menu she has chosen to cook for you on the 4th July:


Cuttlefish for sale in Spain

"If you ask me what is the common factor in the members of my family, I would say: it is food. We love cooking and eating, and even when we are eating we are already thinking about the next meal we are going to prepare.

I learnt to cook being a young teenager by watching my grandmothers, my mother and my uncles and aunties in the kitchen. My father comes from Malaga and my mother from Ceuta, and although I was born and grew up in Tenerife and live in Madrid for many years, the Andalusian table is the one I recognize as my childhood food.

The menu for the 4th July is the result of asking my parents and uncles: what should I cook for a Spanish dinner at the supper club? It includes some well known Spanish dishes as the tortilla de patatas or the salmorejo cordobes. You will recognise the Andalusian and even Moorish origin of most of the dishes, like the spinach with chickpeas or the almond and saffron sauce that I will use to prepare a chicken stew. I have also included the rabo de toro stew, which is very traditional in Madrid but also in Andalusia, and which it is the only recipe in the menu, together with the Tarta de Santiago, that I have not learnt from my family.

I hope you will enjoy it!"


-----

Starters (Tapas style):


  • Salmorejo Cordobés (v): tomatoes, bread, garlic and olive oil blend in a creamy soup and served chilled. This is, together with the gazpacho, the summer starter in the South of Spain.

  • Tortilla de Patatas (v): I could have it for breakfast, lunch or dinner. Warm or Cold. It is always good!

  • Pisto Manchego (v): Peppers, tomatoes, courgette and aubergine stew. It is the Spanish answer to the French ratouille.

  • Espinacas y Garbanzos (v): spinach and chickpeas in a cumin and paprika stew. At home we eat it as a soup, but I will prepare it here as a dry stew, in the way it is presented in many tapas bar in Sevilla.

  • Croquetas: Spanish croquettes, which are prepared with Bechamel sauce and without potatoes. They could be with Chorizo or tuna or mushrooms (to be decided!)


Mains (served with rice in the Spanish style):


  • Chocos en Amarillo: Literally, “Cuttlefish in Yellow”. An aromatic cuttlefish and carrots stew.

  • Pollo en Salsa de Almendras: Creamy almond and saffron chicken stew.

  • Rabo de Toro: Ox tail braised with Sherry wine. You cannot get more Spanish!


Dessert:

  • Flan

  • Tarta de Santiago: the traditional almond based cake from Santiago de Compostela.


Cost will be £45, of which £35 goes to MSF. Please email us with bookings on info@parkholmesupperclub.co.uk as soon as possible, as we do get booked up quite quickly.


The Feast of St George - a Georgian Supra

posted 2 Jun 2015, 16:32 by Parkholme Supperclub   [ updated 6 Apr 2016, 05:16 ]

23rd April 2016

By Levan Verdzeuli ლევან ვერძეული - Saint George in Tbilisi, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=19006387

The 23rd April is St George's Day.  St. George is also the patron saint of Georgia - though it's disputed if the country is named after him, they do have 365 churches consecrated to him, one for each day of the year, and there is a massive monument to him in Tblisi.  In doing a bit of research, I discovered that St George was actually a Roman soldier, and "the dragon" was actually supposed to have been slain in Beirut. I always imagined it was in some Welsh village or something, but I suppose it makes more sense as large reptiles are more likely to be found in the Levant than Wales.  Georgia is closer to his roots, so they've been on to him, oh, about 1,000 years longer than us.  

Georgian food is not well known in the West but is renown within the Soviet bloc for having the best food that the ex-Soviet Union had to offer (and champagne too – search out their wine it’s excellent).  Their feasts (supras) are legendary – the tables are so covered with dishes that there is barely room for plates to eat off, indeed it’s considered rude to have to pass anything as there should be so many dishes within easy reach.


A real live Georgian Feast

a real Georgian feast - you can barely see the table

Georgian culture has remained very distinct from that of the rest of the Soviet Union, keeping its own language, and to a great extent, so has its food. Georgian food is rich in aubergines, fresh herbs, walnuts and pomegranates. 

An unusual aspect of Georgian cuisine is that it uses both dill and coriander leaf in the cuisine, often in the same recipes. This to me exemplifies the location of Georgia - straddling North and South, in between Russia and Turkey. Dill is such a northern herb, and coriander leaf such a southern one. But Georgia also straddles Asia and Europe, being on the Silk Road, so you also see aspects similar to Middle Eastern cooking in the meze-style feasts, as well as northern-style dishes such as dumplings, and of course Russian influenced dishes.

Come and try a real Georgian Supra for yourself - you will not be able to see the table for food. Perhaps you can even pick a Tamada (toastmaster) from your fellow diners and drink in the Georgian style too! (In Georgia, you can ONLY drink when toasting something!)

Khachapuri - the ubiquitous traditional Georgian Cheese Bread 

Mtsvane Pamidori - Green tomatoes with carrots

Isphanaki Phkali - Spinach with spices

Chicken Satsivi- Chicken in a Walnut sauce

Chanacki - Baked Lamb with aubergine and potatoes (vegetarian option available)

Chirbuli - Cauliflower with Eggs

Lobio - classic Georgian Beans cooked homestyle 

Red Beet Phkali - Beetroot with walnuts

Chicken and Lettuce Salad - With pomegranate seeds and cooked lettuce! (vegetarian option available)

Badrijiani - Aubergines stuffed with walnuts and pomegranate seeds

Beet and Bean Tkemali - With a plum sauce

Georgian Salad Made with cold pressed virgin sunflower oil

Dessert will be a scrumptious Georgian version of baklava, Phaklava - made with, you guessed it, walnuts, quite unlike its middle-eastern counterparts, and pomegranates

And, we promise you won't be able to see the tablecloth for the number of dishes on the table, in true Georgian fashion. You'll be begging us to stop... they did last time anyway!

Click here to see a map of Georgia

If you'd like to see more photos of Georgia, I have put an album on our Facebook page


Cost will be £45, of which £35 goes to MSF. Please email us with bookings on
info@parkholmesupperclub.co.uk as soon as possible, as we do get booked up quite quickly.

We will be teaching a lesson with some of the recipes from this supperclub on the 27th April, please contact us for more details on info@parkholmesupperclub.co.uk or click here

The Georgian Feast

posted 2 Jun 2015, 16:32 by Parkholme Supperclub   [ updated 3 Jun 2015, 00:22 ]

20th June 2015

A real live Georgian Feast
a real Georgian feast - you can barely see the table

Chanacki is one of my favourite dishes.  Meltingly tender lamb baked with aubergines, tomatoes, herbs and topped with potatoes, it’s rustic Caucasus cooking at its very best.  Georgian food is not well known in the West but is renown within the Soviet bloc for having the best food that the ex-Soviet Union had to offer (and champagne too – search out their wine it’s excellent).  Their feasts (supras) are legendary – the tables are so covered with dishes that there is barely room for plates to eat off, indeed it’s considered rude to have to pass anything as there should be so many dishes within easy reach.

Georgian culture has remained very distinct from that of the rest of the Soviet Union, keeping its own language, and to a great extent, so has its food. Georgian food is rich in aubergines, fresh herbs, walnuts and pomegranates. 

An unusual aspect of Georgian cuisine is that it uses both dill and coriander leaf in the cuisine, often in the same recipes. This to me exemplifies the location of Georgia - straddling North and South, in between Russia and Turkey. Dill is such a northern herb, and coriander leaf such a southern one. But Georgia also straddles Asia and Europe, being on the Silk Road, so you also see aspects similar to Middle Eastern cooking in the meze-style feasts, as well as northern-style dishes such as dumplings, and of course Russian influenced dishes.

Come and try a real Georgian Supra for yourself - you will not be able to see the table for food. Perhaps you can even pick a Tamada (toastmaster) from your fellow diners and drink in the Georgian style too! (In Georgia, you can ONLY drink when toasting something!)

Khachapuri - the ubiquitous traditional Georgian Cheese Bread 

Mtsvane Pamidori - Green tomatoes with carrots

Isphanaki Phkali - Spinach with spices

Chicken Satsivi- Chicken in a Walnut sauce

Chanacki - Baked Lamb with aubergine and potatoes (vegetarian option available)

Chirbuli - Cauliflower with Eggs

Lobio - classic Georgian Beans cooked homestyle 

Red Beet Phkali - Beetroot with walnuts

Chicken and Lettuce Salad - With pomegranate seeds and cooked lettuce! (vegetarian option available)

Badrijiani - Aubergines stuffed with walnuts and pomegranate seeds

Beet and Bean Tkemali - With a plum sauce

Georgian Salad Made with cold pressed virgin sunflower oil

Dessert will be a scrumptious Georgian version of baklava, Phaklava - made with, you guessed it, walnuts, quite unlike its middle-eastern counterparts, and pomegranates

And, we promise you won't be able to see the tablecloth for the number of dishes on the table, in true Georgian fashion. You'll be begging us to stop... they did last time anyway!

Click here to see a map of Georgia

If you'd like to see more photos of Georgia, I have put an album on our Facebook page


Cost will be £45, of which £35 goes to MSF. Please email us with bookings on
info@parkholmesupperclub.co.uk as soon as possible, as we do get booked up quite quickly.

We will be teaching a lesson with some of the recipes from this supperclub on 18th June & possibly another date, please contact us for more details on info@parkholmesupperclub.co.uk or click here

Zaytoun - Palestinian Supperclub

posted 10 May 2015, 16:16 by Parkholme Supperclub   [ updated 14 May 2015, 07:13 ]



6th June 2015

This supperclub will showcase the products of a very special company, Zaytoun.  Zaytoun is a fair-trade, not-for-profit enterprise that supports Palestinian farmers, living under occupation, to find new markets for their artisan products.  Zaytoun distributes organic olive oil, za’atar, Jericho’s finest medjool dates, almonds from a farmers co-operative, organic Maftoul, Freekeh and olive oil soap.  If you don’t know what all of them are – come along and find out! 

A great success, so far Zaytoun have doubled the market for Palestinian products, reaching new consumers.  We heard about it because one of our regular guests has started to distribute it in our local area – they are selling it entirely at cost price, and we will both use them and have some of the products for sale on the night.  If you live locally you can contact them on N1oliveoil@gmail.com for more details or see their pricelist here.

We will be using the skills of a highly accomplished Palestinian cook Nisreen Abuorf, who cooked our much acclaimed Bethelehem Supperclub, to showcase some of the more unusual ingredients like Freekeh and Maftoul – she’s very busy as she just had a baby, so get a taste of some of her amazing cooking on this rare occasion!   In addition the dessert she’s cooking is my absolute favourite Arabic dessert, ever.

This is a unique opportunity to sample the authentic taste of Palestinian food.  Though sharing many recipes with its Levantine neighbours, Palestinian food is distinguished by its savoury and earthy rustic flavours, deeply ingrained in its peasant and urban heritage and using only the best ingredients grown in their beloved homeland.


Falafel (v) - A staple Palestinian street food, with coriander, parsley and spices, fried to golden perfection

Hummous (v) - Another Palestinian must have dish on the table, a delicious homemade chickpea purée with garlic, lemon and tahini

Bamyeh bil zait (v) - The 'war version' of the beloved okra stew only cooked better with fresh tomatoes, garlic, Zaytoun olive oil and basil

Manaish zatar (v) - A very special Palestinian pastry topped with the famous zatar and zait, a Zaytoun herb and sesame mix with delicious Zaytoun extra virgin olive oil

Sabanekh bil zait (v) - Spinach, onions, zaytoun olive oil and spices cooked till sticky and sweet

Labaneh with zatar and olive oil (v) Home made delicious labneh (thick and creamy Palestinian yogurt) garnished with delicious Zaytoun zatar and Zaytoun olive oil

Salatet bandora (v) A delicious Gazan spicy tomato salad with garlic, chillies, fennel seeds, lemon juice and Zaytoun olive oil

Zahra mashwiyeh with tahini sauce (v) - A rustic Palestinian mezze of roasted cauliflower in a tahini and yogurt sauce

Main dishes

Kharoof mahshi bil Freekeh  - A whole shoulder of lamb roasted with Zaytoun Freekeh (roasted green wheat) and garnished with Zaytoun almonds, accompanied with a yoghurt sauce

Musakhan bil jaj - The most beloved Palestine dish of chicken cooked in sumac, onion and olive oil, spread on taboon bread and roasted in the oven with pine nuts as a garnish

Maftoul syami, vegetarian maftoul (v) - Maftoul is the Palestine version of couscous, the grain is much bigger in size, hence often described as giant couscous, steamed and cooked in a vegetarian broth and served with a hearty vegetarian stew with chickpeas, onions and vegetables

Dessert

Kunafah Nabulsiyeh The most popular dessert in Palestine originating from the city of Nablus, a special blend of white cheese and kunafah pastry cooked in the oven and soaked with rose water syrup and sprinkled with pistachios

Stuffed Zaytoun Majdoul dates with Zaytoun almonds

Turkish coffee or black tea with mint leaves


Cost will be £45 a head of which £35 will go direct to MSF, who are of course also working in Palestine.  
Please e-mail us with bookings on info@parkholmesupperclub.co.uk

Ghana Night 2015

posted 23 Apr 2015, 00:56 by Parkholme Supperclub   [ updated 23 Apr 2015, 00:56 ]


On the 9th May we are lucky to have Nana cooking us her ever-popular Ghana night. New on the menu for this year are several delicious sounding dishes including Ghanaian doughnuts - Bof-Rot, worth a visit for the name alone!  Nana is just back from a visit to Ghana and has this to tell us:
********

Where are you from?

A question I’m often asked and with a plethora of possible answers. My mother came to England from Ghana when she was ten, my father from the same place, to study medicine in Aberdeen. With only one childhood visit (which I hated!) growing up, Ghana was a faraway place, almost mythological, in terms of my background.

Over the past few years, and quite probably, in a bid to find out more about myself, I’ve been increasingly curious to discover more about this beautiful country. As I discovered on a recent visit this month, it takes time. In many ways, as the child of immigrant parents, I will always be ‘obrene’, not a local, but an English girl in Ghana. Despite this, and without any shred of bias, Ghana is just one of those places that gets under your skin.  I am finally beginning to develop an infectious sense of well-being and calm as soon as I step off the plane. London, for all its comfort, convenience and familiarity will always have a place in my heart as my home. Yet, in being surrounded by so many familiar faces and the things I know and love, this recent trip too, became a trip back home.

The dishes I present to you today are as familiar to me as fish and chips, and although I didn’t really learn to cook until my twenties, the shopping, the chopping, the grinding, stewing and frying, was an integral part of being a Ghanaian girl growing up.

Menu:

Spicy beef kebabs – a typical Ghanaian street food often found at parties and in bars;

Fried yam

Fried fish

Served with shito – a spicy hot pepper sauce

Peanut soup with rice balls – a long-time favourite of mine and of PSC

Jollof rice – the main event, you will find several variations of this throughout W Africa and its origins are hotly debated. A firm favourite for any celebration, although frankly, for most of us it‘s far too good to warrant a celebration. ‘People disappoint, jollof is eternal’

Lamb/chicken stew

Plain boiled rice

Fried plantain

Ghana salad

 

Dessert –

‘Bof-rot’ - Ghanaian doughnuts – not traditionally served as a desert but a party snack, but too good to miss!

Pineapple upside down cake  - a PSC signature dish

Cost will be £45 a head of which £35 will go direct to MSF.  
Please e-mail us with bookings on info@parkholmesupperclub.co.uk

Penang Nyonya Food

posted 9 Apr 2015, 11:11 by Parkholme Supperclub   [ updated 9 Apr 2015, 11:23 ]

25th April 2015


Penang is known as the foodie capital of Malaysia.  Predominantly populated by Chinese, the local food is typically Nyonya, which are Straits Chinese - Chinese immigrants who have adopted local customs, and also local ingredients in their cooking. Three of the most famous dishes of Penang are Asam Laksa, which is a spicy noodle dish in a tamarind fish soup, Penang Rojak, which is a kind of fruit/salad in a tangy shrimp sauce, and Or-Chien, which is an oyster omelette.  You can usually see the Chinese influence in Nyonya dishes but they use local ingredients such as hae-ko, a local shrimp paste, and laksa leaves (polygonum), which would be unheard of in China.

As I've spent the last 2 weeks in Penang we will celebrate Penang Nyonya food with these 3 dishes (my aunt taught me to make her great Penang Laksa today), as well as home made chicken satay (let's hope the weather is good enough for barbequeing!) and the interesting dish of Joo Hoo Char, which is dried cuttlefish and vegetables fry, and anything else I feel like cooking at the time!  Perhaps Curry Puffs...you know you never leave hungry ;-).  Definitely Nyonya Kuih for dessert, which are local sweet snacks...



I'll be bringing back some of the specialist ingredients for this supperclub direct from Penang so book up quick as this won't be repeated till my next trip to Malaysia!

The price of the dinner will be £45 of which £35 will go direct to the charity Medecins Sans Frontieres.
To book, please email us at info@parkholmesupperclub.co.uk 

We have one remaining space in our Malay cooking lesson on the 30th April and a final space in the Syrian one on the 23rd April, all other lessons this month are fully booked!  Please email us to snap up these spaces.  We will also be planning a Nyonya lesson based on this supperclub so contact us for more details.


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